Network Middleware Applications™
Network Middleware Applications

Given the march of technology, the only way to truly protect information is through the absence of a target — because no firewall is good enough, and no defense is strong enough, to stop every attacker from inflicting harm.
The NMA Manifesto

Today, cybersecurity products are lost in an “arms race” scenario that seems to have no end in sight, with ever newer tools and updates that are defeated the next day by ever newer tools and updates from the other side. Meanwhile, costs rise, usability and productivity take a dive.

And we hear those who say that “no computer is safe on the Internet”. So, you bear with the hassle of cybersecurity, for it’s better than the losses’ cost.

Because it’s said...

- there is somewhere an inevitable weakest link, which is then the single point of failure for a fault or an attack.

- any effort of making that link stronger will not make the single point of failure go away; at most it may shift it.

- and it’s just a matter of time for a newer weakest link to be found, and exploited.

So, you better watch out...

- protect those weak links, even though you know that at some point that protection is going to be futile. A weak link is a static target that, sooner or later, will be breached.

- keep moving to “ever better defenses“ and, perhaps, even attack back too.

And pay...

Today, more security means more cost and less usability. You know that the return on investment will be negative, and may not offset the potential losses, but you pay ... as part of your regulatory burden or just as “the cost of doing business”.

Yet, no incremental investment will prevent the other side from potentially being effective when changing tactics, which will be quickly motivated by your very countermeasures.

Now...

While waiting for the next attack... or the next defense...

Look at your phone, your organization’s IT system, even the entire Internet if you will.

They are your cyberbody.

Remember that your body is not as weak as its weakest cell.

So, neither is your cyberbody as weak as its weakest link.

You start to view cybersecurity as your body would see its own defenses...

Primarily as a form of understanding, of deep and wide collaboration in many diverse networks, not just isolation or confinement.

You see how the body can change or even eliminate static targets, rather than just protect them.

Yes, that’s wise. Protection has a non-zero probability to fail, which can then facilitate a breach elsewhere.

Yes!

Attacks are futile if there’s no target to attack. You now start to see how your computer might become both more usable and safer online. Along with your organization’s IT... and the Internet.

We call it Sans-Target

No Target: NMA ZSentry enables the ultimate and fail-safe defense against data theft, which is to not have the data in the first place. In IT security terms, ZSentry shifts the information security solution space from the hard and yet-unsolved security problem of protecting servers and clients against penetration attacks to a connection reliability problem that is solvable today.

We have been working hard so that this vision becomes a reality that anyone can use, and we invite you to try our ZSentry product (should work with anything you have): NMA ZSentry»

This site is an introduction to the NMA Manifesto as our design vision for Network Middleware Applications»





The Fort Knox Syndrome
The conventional risk model used in IT security is that of a link chain. The system is seen as a chain of events, where the weakest link is found and made stronger. But this approach is bound to fail.

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HIPAA-compliance is
NMA ZSentry»

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Ed Gerck